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Last Updated: Jan 12, 2018 URL: http://shs.bellinghamschools.libguides.com/Poverty Print Guide RSS Updates

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Poverty Compounded

Staying poor isn’t just a matter of having too little money—it’s about a series of unstable circumstances that build upon each other.

It’s true that poverty affects people of all races, genders, and nationalities, but it’s also true that poverty—especially deep, persistent, intergenerational poverty—plagues some groups more than others. That’s because poverty isn’t just a matter of making too little money to pay the bills or living in a bad neighborhood—it’s about a series of circumstances and challenges that build upon each other, making it difficult to create stability and build wealth.

How Poverty Changes the Brain

You saw the pictures in science class—a profile view of the human brain, sectioned by function. The piece at the very front, right behind where a forehead would be if the brain were actually in someone’s head, is the pre-frontal cortex. It handles problem-solving, goal-setting, and task execution. And it works with the limbic system, which is connected and sits closer to the center of the brain. The limbic system processes emotions and triggers emotional responses, in part because of its storage of long-term memory.

When a person lives in poverty, a growing body of research suggests the limbic system is constantly sending fear and stress messages to the prefrontal cortex, which overloads its ability to solve problems, set goals, and complete tasks in the most efficient ways.

Towards the End of Poverty - The Economist

PEW Research Articles

  • Americans deepest in poverty lost more ground in 2016
    Although the overall U.S. poverty rate declined and incomes rose rapidly for the second straight year in 2016, many poor Americans fell deeper into poverty, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data.
  • How wealth inequality has changed in the U.S. since the Great Recession, by race, ethnicity and income
    The Great Recession of 2007-2009 triggered a sharp, prolonged decline in the wealth of American families, and an already large wealth gap between white households and black and Hispanic households widened further in its immediate aftermath. But the racial and ethnic wealth gap has evolved differently for families at different income levels, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the Federal Reserve Board’s Survey of Consumer Finances.
  • Black child poverty rate holds steady, even as other groups see declines
    The share of American children living in poverty has declined slightly since 2010 as the nation’s economy has improved. But the poverty rate has changed little for black children, the group most likely to be living in poverty, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data.
  • Seven-in-ten people globally live on $10 or less per day
    “The need to resolve the structural causes of poverty cannot be delayed, not only for the pragmatic reason of its urgency for the good order of society, but because society needs to be cured of a sickness which is weakening and frustrating it, and which can only lead to new crises. … Inequality is the root of social ills.”
  • 5 facts about Millennial households
    Millennials are the largest living generation by population size (79.8 million in 2016), but they trail Baby Boomers and Generation Xers when it comes to the number of households they head. Many Millennials still live under their parents’ roof or are in a college dorm or some other shared living situation. As of 2016, Millennials (ages 18 to 35 in 2016) headed only 28 million households, many fewer than were headed by Generation X (ages 36 to 51 in 2016) or Baby Boomers (ages 52 to 70).

Poverty Rate by Race/Ethnicity in the US

Poverty Overview from the US Dept of Agriculture

Census Bureau Income & Poverty

 

Poverty is Sexist

“Nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men. Nowhere. But for girls and women in the poorest countries, that inequality is amplified,” the organization’s website reads. “We won’t end extreme poverty until we break down the barriers holding girls and women back.”   Bono’s ONE Campaign

 

World Bank Poverty Data

 

Poverty | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

 

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty

 

The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck in a Hole

 

Why It Matters

NO POVERTY: 

WHY IT MATTERS

What’s the goal here?

To end poverty in all its forms everywhere by 2030. Why?

More than 700 million people still live in extreme poverty and are struggling to fulfil the most basic needs like health, education, and access to water and sanitation, to name a few.

That’s a lot of people.

Yes. The overwhelming majority of people living on less than $1.90 a day live in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa and they account for about 70 per cent of the global total of extremely poor people.

Right now

  there are

 30 million

 children

growing up

 poor in

the world’s

richest

countries.

    Lower middle-income countries, including China, India, Indonesia and Nigeria, are home to about half of the global poor.

    However, this issue also affects developed countries. Right now there are 30 million children growing up poor in the world’s richest      countries.


Why is there so much poverty in the world?

Poverty has many dimensions, but its causes include unemployment, social exclusion, and high vulnerability of certain population to disasters, diseases and other phenomena which prevent them from being productive.

I’m not poor. Why should I care about other people’s economic situation?

There are many reasons, but in short, because as human beings, our well- being is linked to each other. Growing inequality is detrimental to economic growth and undermines social cohesion, increasing political and social tensions and, in some circumstances, driving instability and conflicts. Can we actually achieve this goal?

Yes. To end extreme poverty worldwide in 20 years, economist Jeffrey Sachs calculated that the total cost per year would be about $175 billion. This represents less than one percent of the combined income of the richest countries in the world.

So what can I do about it?

If you are a young person: Your active engagement in policymaking can make a difference in addressing poverty. It ensures that your rights are promoted and that your voice is heard, that inter-generational knowledge is shared, and that innovation and critical thinking are encouraged at all ages to support transformational change in people’s lives and communities.

If you are a policymaker: Governments can help create an enabling environment to generate productive employment and job opportunities for the poor and the marginalized. They can formulate strategies and fiscal policies that stimulate pro-poor growth, and reduce poverty.

If you work in the private sector: The private sector, as an engine of economic growth, has a major role to play in determining whether the growth it creates is inclusive and hence contributes to poverty reduction. It can promote economic opportunities for the poor, focusing on segments of the economy where most of the poor are active, namely on micro and small enterprises and those operating in the informal sector.

If you are part of the science and academic community: The academic and education community have a major role in increasing the awareness about the impact of poverty. Science provides the foundation for new and sustainable approaches, solutions and technologies to tackle the challenges of reducing poverty and achieving sustainable development. The contribution of science to end poverty has been significant. For example, it has enabled access to safe drinking water, reduced deaths caused by water-borne diseases, and improved hygiene to reduce health risks related to unsafe drinking water and lack of sanitation.

To find out more about Goal

#1 and other Sustainable Development Goals visit:

http://www.un.org/ sustainabledevelopment

NPR Articles

  • Beyond Pantries: This Food Bank Invests In The Local Community
    Wayne County, New York, is the biggest producer of apples in the Empire State. Yet, in 2013 public school children in the county were being served apples from Washington on their lunch trays. At the end of the lunch period, the lovely, whole Washington apples ended up mostly uneaten in the garbage.

    Tom Ferraro, founder of the Rochester, NY, food bank Foodlink, set about solving the problem. Ferraro was familiar with a recent study showing that children were more likely to eat sliced fruit than whole. Since Foodlink had the facilities to wash, slice and package apples into portions, Ferraro decided to purchase apples from local farmers, process them, and sell them back to local schools.
  • The U.N. Looks At Extreme Poverty In The U.S., From Alabama To California
    "Some might ask why a U.N. Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights would visit a country as rich as the United States. But despite great wealth in the U.S., there also exists great poverty and inequality." That was part of a statement issued by Philip Alston, a New York University law and human rights professor, who is leading the mission.
  • One Man's Quest To Feed A Hungry, Isolated California County
    Across the United States, more than one out of every 10 people is "food insecure," which means they don't know where their next meal is coming from. In Trinity County, a sparsely populated area in northwestern California, that number is closer to one in five.
    Jeff England, director of the Trinity County Food Bank, is trying to change that.
  • An Experiment Gives Cash Aid To The Poor. Is That Ethical?
    Many readers of this blog told us they were inspired by the first story in our series on #nostringscash aid — about a ground-breaking experiment in Kenya to test the benefits of giving poor people a steady stream of cash in place of traditional aid.
    But some questioned the ethics of studies like this.
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